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A blog brought to you by the Wellesley College Sexual Health Educators devoted to bringing you up to date information concerning your sexual health, on campus and off.
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Meet the SHEs

Contraceptive Used in Africa May Double Risk of H.I.V.

stuckinthesuburbs:

Sec. Hillary Clinton Defends Reproductive Rights and Family Planning  

One of our lovely alums (Class of ‘69) fighting the good fight as Secretary of State.

Health Insurers Must Cover Birth Control With No Copays

Coming to you in January of 2013, no more annoying copays for what you do to protect your body!

Health insurance plans must cover birth control as preventive care for women, with no copays, the Obama administration said Monday in a decision with far-reaching implications for health care as well as social mores.

The requirement is part of a broad expansion of coverage for women’s preventive care under President Barack Obama’s health care law. Also to be covered without copays are breast pumps for nursing mothers, an annual “well-woman” physical, screening for the virus that causes cervical cancer and for diabetes during pregnancy, counseling on domestic violence, and other services.

"These historic guidelines are based on science and existing (medical) literature and will help ensure women get the preventive health benefits they need," said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.

[….]

Indeed, a government study last summer found that birth control use is virtually universal in the United States, according to a government study issued last summer. More than 90 million prescriptions for contraceptives were dispensed in 2009, according the market analysis firm INS health. Generic versions of the pill are available for as little as $9 a month. Still, about half of all pregnancies are unplanned. Many are among women using some form of contraception, and forgetting to take the pill is a major reason.

Preventing unwanted pregnancies is only one goal of the new requirement. Contraception can help make a woman’s next pregnancy healthier by spacing births far enough apart, generally 18 months to two years. Research links closely spaced births to a risk of such problems as prematurity, low birth weight, even autism. Research has shown that even modest copays for medical care can discourage use.

amillionparachutes:

 
Huffington Post: Always Runs First Feminine Hygiene Ad To Show Blood

If marketing campaigns have taught us anything about periods, it is that menstruating women love to dance, are drawn to white spandex and, oh yeah, bleed a Kool-Aid like blue liquid … which they store in beakers.


Fabulous!

amillionparachutes:

Huffington Post: Always Runs First Feminine Hygiene Ad To Show Blood

If marketing campaigns have taught us anything about periods, it is that menstruating women love to dance, are drawn to white spandex and, oh yeah, bleed a Kool-Aid like blue liquid … which they store in beakers.

Fabulous!

"Vibrators find a home in drugstore aisles." Check it out at CVS!